CATERINA ALBANO

 

Caterina Albano is a Reader in Visual Culture at Central Saint Martins, University of the Arts London and holds a PhD in Renaissance Studies (London University). Albano curates, lectures and publishes in the fields of art, cultural history and cultural theory, in particular emotion and affect, memory and consciousness; and on the theory of curating. She is the author of Memory, Forgetting and the Moving Image (Palgrave MacMillan, 2016) and Fear and Art in the Contemporary World (Reaktion Books, 2012), of journal articles and essays on the history of emotion, anatomy, on memory and contemporary art, and curating. Albano convened the international symposium Anxious Places: Angst, Environments and Affective Contamination (CSM, University of the Arts London, 2014) and other events part of UAL collaboration to the Anxiety Arts Festival London. She has convened of the Art and Science Research Group (CSM), and of the Archive Forum. 

Her curatorial work includes the exhibitions Psychoanalysis: The Unconscious in Everyday Life (Science Museum, London, 2009-10), and Crossing Over: Art, Science and Biotechnologies (The Royal Institution of Great Britain, London, 2008). She was the curatorial consultant for John Snow: Cartographies of Life and Death (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, 2013) and for the Wellcome Trust exhibitions Medicine and Art: Imagining a Future for Life and Love – Leonardo, Okyo, Damien Hirst (Mori Museum, Tokyo, 2009-10), and First Time Out (Wellcome Collection, 2011). She co-curated the exhibitions Head On: Art with the Brain in Mind (Science Museum/Wellcome Trust, 2002) and The Genius of Genetics (Mendel Museum, Brno 2002). Albano was the senior researcher for Artakt’s two major exhibitions Spectacular Bodies (Hayward Gallery 2000) and Seduced (Barbican Art Gallery 2007). For the latter, she curated The Voice of Sex.

 

The End is a Distant Memory, Helen Pynor, 2016

Video production still. Photo: Jürgen Jeibmann, Ronald Schemmel, Helen Pynor

Image courtesy the artist